I've joined the DSLR crowd!

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I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby SandyLee » Sat Oct 20, 2012 8:53 pm

Bit the proverbial "bullet"..... recently bought a Canon 60D and a Tamron SP 70-300mm lens! :W
LOTS to learn... first I've learned: DSLR's DON'T like the "Auto" settings! Working to understand the best way to learn the "terminology of the camera, and to progress and take better images.... any and ALL recommendations are welcome! Still not sure if my "pea-brain" can log in enough info to set stuff up properly.... but I LOVE a challenge! (btw... wish me luck!) :P
- Sandy
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby res » Sat Oct 20, 2012 8:58 pm

GOOD LUCK!!!! :lol:
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby SandyLee » Sat Oct 20, 2012 9:13 pm

Thanks a pantload, Res!!!! :shock:
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby yoiks » Sun Oct 21, 2012 4:42 am

Woohoo! It takes a bit of getting used to but the more you shoot and process photos after the more you realize what it is you need to pay attention to... at least that's how it is in my case. :)

As for auto mode, I know of at least a few "professional photographers" that never shoot anything BUT auto! :S
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby res » Sun Oct 21, 2012 7:12 am

Cameras have tools on them. Each setting, each control, each feature is a tool. I know this was not headed that way but I do not see people as better or worse photographers based on what tool in their tool box they are using. Is it nice to have more tools in the box so you can use them at certain times. By all means but if I choose not to use certain tools, that is fine as well. The finished photo is what is judged. When we say auto, (on canon I say green box) it is a tool that will do everything for you. A great tool where snapshots and recording moments with the family is the goal. BUT, there is no real creativity except in your composition of course. The camera picks everything so if you want a blurred background and the camera says there is enough light to use a smaller aperture, then you will get a picture with a lot of depth of field and not a blurred one as you were thinking. Program allows you more control and I have used this one the most of the 2 full auto modes. Av allows you to set the aperture you want to shoot and the camera will pick the shutter speed accordingly. Tv allows you to pick a shutter speed and the camera will pick the aperture for you. Manual means it is all yours. You pick both. All are tools. The thing to remember, all "modes" except manual require the camera to average out your settings. So, if you have a photo with a lot of shadow and a beam of light in the center, the beam of light will probably be OVER exposed since the camera will see all the shadows and boost your exposure to meet the average amount of brightness it is programed to meet. If you shoot in the bright snow, the images will appear grey since the camera will see all the light and lower the exposure to that same brightness level. Each situation can be overcome using the exposure compensation settings but again, knowing how to use a tool. I admit, I have started shooting manual quite a bit on my cameras. I have them set to center point focus and use what is called back button focus so that I focus with my thumb not my shutter. When shooting birds in flight in light that is changing a lot, I will switch to Av, set my aperture as large as my lens will go, and let the camera pick the shutter. I also set the camera to spot meter off the center focal point. Will I get a blurry one on occasion if I miss the meter showing slow shutter speed? Yes, but it helps when a bird is flying along and hitting different areas of light and I am not quick enough to make the settings by hand. Picking ISO helps with that. A higher ISO allows for faster shutter speed when the light lowers. If you are working in bright light, sometimes with things that are moving very quickly, picking your shutter speed (Tv) is a good way to go. Tools I have learned to use. I have developed enough that I am trying to create a photo many times not just take one. But I have to admit, I giggle at both ends of this spectrum. I find it quite humorous the photographers who thump their chest and are proud to say they ONLY shoot in manual. They don't want to use other tools in their tool box and that is fine but is does not in my mind make them superior. I feel bad for those who are sold a bill of goods, pay really big cash for a DSLR and never take it out of green box full auto. They would have been better served with a very high end point and shoot, saved 75% on the cost of the camera (minimum) and it would probably get used more. Even the high end P&S have many of the modes to pick from if they choose to learn. Each person is free to pick the tools and methods they want to use to meet their photographic goals. Just my humble opinion! :lol:
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby psycchic1 » Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:12 am

Congratulations! We look forward to your shots! You'll have fun!!!
"Great photography isn't about documenting that you saw it...
...it's about capturing how you experienced the moment!"


http://www.langellphotography.com
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby SandyLee » Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:03 pm

Thanks, Res and Lisa!
The thing I'm trying to get used to, is that on my SX10, I could "adapt" even the auto settings, like E/C, ISO, fill flash, and W/B. Unless I'm stupid (which is likely) I don't seem to be able to make these adustments in the "Auto" choices of the 60D. Since I often "shoot on the fly" (well, not literally on "A" Fly! ;) ), I need to figure out how best to quickly set-up exposures for various situations... especially on the water. All in all... this seems to be a great "beginner" set-up, and will continue to make the camera work for ME... not for itself!

Notes on the Tamron....this seems to be a great lens for the price. Love the "twist" zoom, rather than push/pull... also love the ability to go "manual focus" without hitting any buttons. Quality is good, especially for the price. 70-300 seems to be an excellent "all around" lens.
- Sandy
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby res » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:15 pm

Haven't used green box in a long time but I believe you are right, full auto is full auto. Switch to program (P) mode. Iso control comes back to you. It will pick the shutter speed and the aperture. To be honest, I personally like AV mode when I am shooting "auto". With that you set the aperature, set the iso, and the camera picks the shutter speed. I am becoming a depth of field nut so am always trying to get the lowest possible aperture. In program and AV, you can also set what is called exposure compensation. IF you are shooting snow let's say (and make everybody nervous) it would be wise to activate the exposure and focus systems by half pressing the shutter button. Let off and immediately turn the large dial on the back of the camera. While doing this, if you watch the settings window on the top of the camera you will see a line going one way or the other on a scale. 0 is default. IF you go plus 1, the camera will expose one full stop brighter then the sensor thinks it should. IF you go -1, it will shoot one full stop under what the sensor says it should. If shooting birds in flight, you may have to shoot as much as +2 to get them to be exposed right. You will have to play with it. On the other hand, if you have the shaft of light I described above, you may have to shoot with a negative compensation to get the shadows truely dark and the shaft of light properly exposed. Hope that helps.
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby SandyLee » Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:39 pm

Yes.... definitely helpful, Res! I'll work on that "P" mode!

I had a nice Pentax SLR YEARS ago, when pretty much ALL settings were manual.... trying to memorize where and how to find them on the DSLR is a "bit" different!
- Sandy
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Re: I've joined the DSLR crowd!

Postby res » Tue Oct 23, 2012 6:43 pm

I am tied up this weekend so by the time we get together, you will have it all figured out and I can explain everything you know!!! :D
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